Sunday, February 15, 2015

Dreams Of Mayberry Tough To Achieve


Anonymous said...

I tried to make an appointment to speak to Bill Reilich about some police matters and was refused. Nice way to treat a taxpayer. The Police Dept still is corrupt and has officers who believe they are above the law. What I would like to know is how can I find out about a certain police officers record as far as complaints filed against him.   
2/15/2015 7:41 PM

48 comments:

Anonymous said...

I'm sure Reilich is just as approachable as Auberger. Greece leaders think they are kings and have contempt for most of the people here, But they vote for them anyway

Anonymous said...

Just a suggestion. Forget about Relic. Instead make an appointment with the chief and discuss the problem with him. If not satisfied, file a formal complaint with the PD.
Regarding your other question, personnel records are confidential and only can be produced as the result of formal criminal or civil action. They are not subject to FOIL requests.

Anonymous said...

The Rahn investigation hide a lot of facts and protected town hall. Several individuals including some Police Officers should have been criminally charged as well. However, it was once said ''If the whole truth came out this department would never recover''. Go to the Buffalo Office of the Attorney General or FBI.

Anonymous said...

Don't make a fool out of yourself and do as 12:59 says.
In your post you make some pretty strong accusations about continuing corruption in the PD. Unless you have substantial evidence that supports that claim, don't waste your time with these agencies.
Perhaps you might like to enlighten us as to what evidence supports your claim of corruption and above the law statements and what incident took place with the PD that caused you to try and see the supervisor in the first place. The suggestion to talk to the chief seems to be a reasonable course of action.

SCATS said...

To 10:13AM ~~ I agree it would be foolish to go to authorities in Buffalo. However, I also agree that OTHER GPD COPS should have been prosecuted during the $1 million investigation! Instead, they were enabled (keyword) to get away from the trouble, often aided to move into other jobs.

As I've said all along: ANYONE WHO KNEW RAHN & CO. WERE DOING WRONG ARE/WERE PART OF THE PROBLEM IN GPD!! And we know there were many!

Joe M said...

Scats while there can be no doubt that Rahn did some improper actions during those incidents involving Joseph, the real culprit that managed to slip the noose that he created was Auburger when he spent 1mil diverting attention and blame from him to others.
It was he that engaged in the " PAY TO PLAY" hiring of Joseph and Pignato. Two well known foul balls from the RPD.that should have never been hired in the first place.
Did you know that when the cops found out Pignato was about to be hired, protest letters were sent to Auburger from them opposing his hiring. Of further note, when Pignato applied for membership in the union, he was voted down. Ultimately, after stacking the next meeting with supporters, he was successful .
A few years prior to the fallout from these hires, I met with Rahn and Mackin to discuss problems he was having with the school district's failure to report serious incidents happening in the schools to the PD.
During this meeting I asked them both what was taking place concerning new officers being hired from other area agencies. Rahn response was most troubling. He said, and I quote. ," Joe , I don't hire anyone, Jack does" He continued by saying that he never interviews them and with few exceptions, he didn't meet them until the night of the board meeting when he swore them in. Mackin verified those statements.
What is germaine to your statement key word,enabled, those officers with close ties to Auburger, that had dirty hands, were offerred alternatives. They were ,put in your retirement papers or face probable charges. I am aware of at least two high ranking officers who took the" Plea Deal "and opted out.

SCATS said...

To Joe M ~~ Since the Town Supervisor holds the pursestrings for hiring, even Reilich has power over Phelan the way Auggie had power over Rahn. Same ole, same ole.

Anonymous said...

10:13 am you sound like a cop. Reilich has authority over P.D. so that is why I want to see him. Cops investigating the cops I think we know how that will turn out. There are cops who abuse the power of the badge and shouldn't be allowed to wear it. I could name a couple of them but I won't at this time. Let's just say they work the night shift. Lying, no good rotten pieces of trash. Its unfortunate that the good ones cover for the bad ones instead of turning them in. I don't think going to the FBI is such a bad idea as GPD needs to be investigated. Still some rotten apples in the basket.

Anonymous said...

If anyone is asleep enough to believe that Aubergers investigation did a full and proper job here is my suggestion. FOIA the Police Department payroll records during Rahn's whole administration. How about we talk about the "Chief Detail" overtime paid to certain cronies!!! What exactly is that function I muzt wonder? How come no one was charged over this issue?

Joe M said...

Scats just a slight correction. Neither Auburger or Reilich are the hiring authority. Actually that responsibility falls to the Town Board to hire and fire. However your point is well taken as while the supervisor has but one of 5 votes, he still controls the other 4 votes as well. Democracy in action. Greece style.

SCATS said...

Let's not forget that when Baxter came here, he told everyone how the changes he made to the Command Structure would ensure against such issues in the future. Guess what? That whole set-up is long gone! Greece, NY ~~ BACK TO FUTURE.

Anonymous said...

How many on here believe the cops version of the shooting on Stone Rd. I for one do not. Yeah, they were knocking for an hour on the doors and windows yelling Police. Sure, maybe 5 minutes and then they walked in. You don't have to answer the door for the Police or anyone. They shot and nearly killed the man and then charge him with a whole lot of crimes to justify what they did. Made up a whole lot of lies as to why they entered. They got a call about loose dogs so if he doesn't answer put a note on the door and be gone. Cops think they can do whatever they want in this town.

SCATS said...

To 8:12PM ~~ I, for one, do NOT believe they had just cause for entering that property!

Anonymous said...

Then why was he indicted by a grand jury?

SCATS said...

To 9:55PM ~~ You've asked a GREAT QUESTION!

Just like with Roderick Scott, a grand jury indictment is only part of the story.

Anonymous said...

3:57 no
I'm not a cop but I do work in the local court system. I will tell you this though, if you try to see the State Attorney, you will get an appointment depending on the nature of you complaint. Unless your complaint has far reaching State wide implications, he or she will simply refer you back to your local jurisdiction. If your complaint is criminal in nature, talk to the DA. Even there you will be subjected to the politics of this county.
If you feel that strongly, file a complaint with the PD outlining the circumstances and the names of those involved. At the very least, they will be bound to answer your eligations
I find it hard to believe that your Supervisor would blow you off without telling you to go see the chief.

Anonymous said...

10:13 After reading my comment , I noticed a mistake. I meant to say the US ATTORNEY instead ofState Attorney.

Anonymous said...

Did you see GPD is now posting select photos of arrests on their website?

SCATS said...

To 9:39AM ~~ Yes, I saw that awhile back. Keyword: select ;)

SCATS said...

To 2/17/2015 9:55 PM ~~ You might want to read the article in today's D&C about the need to reform NY's grand jury system!

""These two legislative steps I have outlined — requiring an active, physical judicial presence in grand jury proceedings investigating potential homicide or serious assault arising out of a police-civilian encounter and ending grand jury secrecy as we know it — will enhance public access to and confidence in the judicial system," Lippman said in the Court of Appeals' chambers."

JoeM said...

Before I begin, I would like to ask you to remember the next two phrases PROBABLE CAUSE TO BELIEVE AND INFORMATION AND BELIEF.I ask this because it has a bearing on the content of my comment regarding the Stone Rd incident. These phases are contained in the State of New York CPL or Criminal Procedure Law.
In addition, my comment will be based on my personal involvement in such situations that presented themselves at the Stone Rd incident when I was a member of the Town PD.
As I recall, this incident began as dog complaint. For this type of job, only one car would be dispatched to the scene. Based on published reports,the initial officer observed some unusual circumstances as he tried to get someone to answer the door. As I recall, he could see a faucet in the kitchen on. In all probability and according to protocol, after not being able to make contact with anyone in the house, he asked for a supervisor to come to the scene. That request resulted in the arrival of the Sargeant in charge of the watch.
After a period of time elapsed and with still no change in the existing circumstances, a decision was made by the watch commander that this would be handled as a
"Check on the welfare situation as there was probable cause to believe things in the home did not lend themselves to normal situation and there was in their minds, cause for concern regarding possible occupants if the house. The decision was made to forcibly enter the home which they did.
Now, here again, I would like you to put yourselves in the officers position when they were confronted with an unexpected situation that exist once inside.
What they were confronted with was a naked man lying on the floor with a fire arm at his side. Not exactly your normal occurrence to say the least.At this point, they had every reason to BELIEVE, that this individual may have been the victim of a crime.
Now if you can, imagine yourself in their position when they approached the subject in an effort to check on his welfare only to be suddenly confronted by the subject who pointed the weapon at them. The result would be obvious. The sergeant had a spit second to respond and had reasonable grounds to BELIEVE his life was in jeoprody and discharged his weapon striking the subject.
Now, for those of you who say it could have been handled differently. To you I say, yes, you are right.
For the sake of argument, let's say that instead of taking the action they did, they concluded that there existed no cause for concern, got back in their cars left the scene and gave the job a code 35, matters adjusted. Had they did this , we wouldn't be talking about it now. But, they would be taking an awful chance if they took no action and things turned out differently.
Let's for a moment consider this scenario. No action taken by responding officers. Father comes home finds his son dead from a gunshot wound and calls police. As a result, he finds out the cops were there earlier and did nothing? Can you imagine the repercussions as a result. I think it would be fair to say that comments on this sight would tend to eviscerate the cops involved for not doing their job.
Trust me when I say this folks, it's not an easy job. As officers we were confronted with situations that requires split second decisions. Decisions that were not always perfect but then again who among us can claim that virtue. I personally remember kicking down doors at least 3 times in my career involving similar check on the welfare situations. It's part of and the nature of the job,

SCATS said...

To Joe M ~~ WHERE did you get the idea "The decision was made to forcibly enter the home which they did." ??

THE DOOR WAS OPEN! They walked in.

I still go back to Phelan's interview where in the SAME BREATH he changed from referring to the tenant as "the victim" to calling him "the suspect."

Joe M said...

Scats, my mistake but does it really make any difference in the long run. So the door was open. They still had to make the decision to enter without a warrant all still based On PROBABLE CAUSE AND INFORMATION AND BELIEF. In either case , under the law , they legally entered the home.They made the right decision to gain entry under the circumstances that they were presented with, plain and simple .

SCATS said...

To Joe M ~~ I think whether it was a "legal" entry or not remains to be seen. Due to their decision-making in this case, I am now scared to death of GPD! I've advised my family to respond to any encounters with them, accordingly.

Anonymous said...

Because of my incident with the GPD my house doors are always locked 24/7. I have a friend who works for the State Police and he was part of the investigation with Rahn and others and he has told me that not much has really changed with the GPD other than the chief.

Joe M said...

OMG Scats do you really feel that threatened by our local police officers? I had no idea you felt that way. I don't understand the reason why. No more than I understand 4:19 remark about locking doors to keep the police out and not the potential acts of criminals.Unbelievable!
No one should have to fear those sworn to protect them.
Help me understand . Is this fear real or has it been brought about by past events leading to the perception that because of
those past incidents, you feel for your safety from the entire department. I find that troubling but at the same time hard to believe or understand the reasons why.
In every profession , there are going to those who should not be there. The police departments all over the country have their share of those types. Greece is no different.
Hell, we had a few on the job back in my time. We even had one go to jail in the late 60's for larceny of town funds from the tax department. All the guys back then knew who they were and were dealt with in the appropriate manner. Believe me, you don't want the rath of your fellow officers coming down on your butt. At least not back then. But that being said, we were a much different breed than today's generation of cops,
My generation took a more cavalier approach to the job until it was time to get serious. With us, there were three very distinct ways in which we applied the law. They were black and white and grey. Black and white obviously referred to right or wrong. However, there were instances that did not fit either and that was the grey. This meant , at least to us, there existed extenuating circumstances that were a factor and called for common sense decisions tempered with lieniency .I'm afraid that today's generation does not subscribe to the grey area and are much to strident in their approach to their duties. It's really not entirely their fault though.
When I joined the force in '64, I was sent to school for 3 weeks, had one day of firearms training , handed a gun and went to work the next day.
In stark contrast, today's recruits attend a 16 week training course where they are schooled in police theory , police ethics etc. based on my limited contact with some present members, they come up short in one of the most important qualities to be successful . That quality is basic common sense. It occurred to me that if they ever possessed this quality, it was drummed out of them during that 16 wk school. It is as though they had been turned into robots as a result.
However, no department would tolerate illegal oppressive behavior on the part of its police officers. I truly believe Greece, with exception of a few bumps in the road a while back, has a proud tradition of exceptional service on behalf of those they swore to serve, guide and protect , would tolerate any violation of that theme. I personally was and still remain, a proud former member of the Greece Police Department.

Anonymous said...

Management styles vary from one to the next but most managers prefer to allow the system to work before they get involved. Before they jump in give the normal channels a chance. Therefor the proper person to report a police concern to is the chief and any person in the department he may direct you to. If the system does not work then reach out to the supervisor. That way two problems can be addressed, yours and why did the system not work. If only the supervisor was the only person to handle a complaint then there would be little time for anything else. You need to go through proper policy first. The procedures were put in place for a reason. If not the next time your ipad mis fires call the CEO of apple and see if he guides you through the reboot. Or maybe call Mr. Ford if you can't figure out how to program your cars navigation.

SCATS said...

To 4:19PM ~~ Agreed. You might want to consider posting a sign stating that "Welfare Checks Are Not Welcome" ... just to be extra safe.

To 7:34PM ~~ You forget. This is MAYBERRY!

Anonymous said...

Joe M. I believe like you do that today's officers don't have common sense. They also lack social skills as does the entire younger generation because of all their tech devices. Younger people don't get out and interact like generations before them and their people skills suffer because of that. Also I believe that some of today's officers are using steroids judging by the size of them and also because of their aggressiveness.
What I don't understand is when other officers know there are bad ones in their dept, why don't they do something about it rather than look the other way. In all my years living in Greece I can say I have not had any good interaction with the dept. When ever there was a problem they generally did nothing but take a report if that and nothing ever came of it.
Joe M. I do fear the actions of the police more than a criminal. A criminal isn't going to cost me a bunch of money and incarcerate me. Did you ever in your career make a mistake and then arrested someone cause you screwed up and rather than admitting it and face possible suspension or loss of your job and incarceration or lawsuit, lied and helped get that person convicted and sent to prison. Well that's what happened to a family member. Lied through their teeth on reports, testimony etc.and an innocent person goes away. Can you understand the bitterness and animosity that I have. Years ago in another town I was in court about an incident and 3 officers got up on the stand and each and every one of them lied through their teeth. I was shocked. These are the same people who are sworn to uphold the law and they have no problem breaking it. If they did their job properly they wouldn't have to lie. So in my opinion from what I've witnessed this seems to be a common thing with police officers. Heard it's called testilying. I truly believe that there are quite a lot of innocent people in jail and prison due to the cops and D.A. We hear about it all the time. These same people treat the justice system as if its a game and they have to win at all cost. These same people should be incarcerated it it can be shown that they knowingly withheld evidence or lied to get a conviction. Not a cop hater Joe M. but lets stop pretending all is well with the GPD.

Anonymous said...

8:14 Amen, and well said. The "system" does whatever it can to suppress opposition, and continue it's behavior. When you tell these people you are corrupt, and need to "police" yourselves they want no part of it. GPD has a very dirty history, and may skeletons in the closest. However, the closet is exactly where they will fight to keep them. These corruption mongers are disgusting. Lets get the record straight; it was well known that a certain former Officer was a user of Cocaine. The night of the accident was not an isolated incident with his drug use. Now I must ask; in this corruption mongers 17 years on the job did he make any false arrests, or manufacture evidence? Big tough FIRED Rochester Police Officer that was allowed to bring his narcissism, and tyranny to Greece because of a certain criminal politician. Sadly he was just one of a bigger undercurrent. Real cops don't cover up felony level crimes for anyone!! Cops who do are nothing but trash, and need to be removed by whatever means necessary.

SCATS said...

To 5:35AM ~~ Re: " The "system" does whatever it can to suppress opposition, and continue it's behavior."

THAT is the very definition of DYSFUNCTION. Dysfunctional folks will do ANYTHING to resist change!

Greece = The Dysfunction Junction ... from our electorate to our electeds.

Joe M said...

8:14 The descriptive word I left out of my original post and something eluded to in your first sentence . That word was Maturity and the lack there of by many if not most of today's generation of cops. Another applicable description is the lack of sensitivity in their approach to their duties. These are some of the things that were part of my generation and are sadly lacking with officers of today.
It's no secret to those who known me that I have an outspoken voice for two changes in the manner in which this county provides for the Public Safety delivery of those services.
One that goes directly to our conversation is my advocacy for changing the age requirement now in place for qualifications required to become an officer.
Presently , a candidate must be at least 21 yrs old. I have critical of this instead proposing moving that age to 25. This philosophy lends itself to your initial comments as well as my added words, maturity and sensitivity. I truly believe 21 is much to young in today's society .
At 21, they lack the necessary social skills to effectively deal with the requirements of the job. For example, adults of this generation, marry much latter in life then those of mine. This fact becomes a factor with today's cops when they are dispatched to a domestic dispute, we used to call them family problems. Since guys of my generation married in their late teens or early 20's ,we understood the dynamics and hazards of dealing with problems between married couples and were more sensitive to situations we encountered. Present cops have no such experience and handle the situation much differently and more aggressively and find themselves in an eventual arrest someone situation
My other initiative , which I studied for over 30 yrs was consolidation of all police services in Monroe county and the benefits that would provide in both services and reduced costs and taxing implications. To this end, I have authored several articles over years promoting this concept to no avail.
You asked, did I ever make a mistake while in my performance of my duties? The answer,yes I did. If your not careful on this job, you can let your emotions overcome your common sense approach to someone you become involved with and end up making an arrest to end the confrontation . The one major difference with me and others I worked with, after rethinking the actions I took and recognized it for what it was, as soon as possible I would withdraw the information contained in the arrest and reverse my actions. This brings me to another major difference in my generations approach to the job. We soon would learn that not all situations were settled satisfactorily with an arrest. We found that things usually worked for the best by use of mediation and common sense straight talk with the subject which usually ended with a hand shake and a better appreciation of the job we were entrusted to do. I think this mindset does not exist in today's application of the law and therein lies the problem.
In closing may I add this.When Supervisor Reilich made his Mayberry remark, that was an indication in my view,that he is aware of some of the things I talk about due to conversation with towns people as well as those involved in our judicial system.

SCATS said...

IMHO, when Reilich made his Mayberry remark, it shows how truly out-of-touch he is with the town he "leads!"

Joe M said...

Scats one SHORT last comment. Your view on the Mayberry comment is one take. However, if you will check my last sentence in my last comment, I mentioned the Judiciary of the town.
This may or may not surprise you but of all the town officials, the Judges of our town court receive the most complaints about the conduct of our officers. When they start to hear the same complaints about a particular officer, they routinely will report this to the administrative judge who will inform the supervisor. It was that way during my time and I'm sure the same format is in place today.
My point being he is aware of these things and the Mayberry comment was prompted by this fact.

SCATS said...

To Joe M ~~ Just because something was working in Greece 35 yrs. ago (your contention) doesn't mean it either works now, or is still in use now. Mayberry will FOREVER be Mayberry! Greece is not and can not ever be Mayberry! (No matter how many times the Supervisor taps his ruby slippers together.)

Joe M said...

scats I wouldn't have responded to your answer to my last post had you not challenged my credibility by inserting the ( Your contention) . Why did you attempt to dimish the facts I posted from personal experience.?Rather presumptious on your part because you weren't and are still not in a position make a judgement on how things worked longer than 35 years ago in the police department for which I worked in for a quarter of a century . I on the other hand lived those experiences that I described.
I find myself in need of asking you a relative question.
While I understand your negative attitude toward today's police department, why did you feel it necessary to attach that negativity to police departments that served Greece well in years gone bye as well as myself?

Anonymous said...

Joe M., you sure did say a lot. I do appreciate your comments and agree 100% about the needing to raise the age requirement. Seems like when I was young all the cops appeared older, not many seemed my age. Now it seems like most of them look as if they could still be in high school and they walk around with an attitude. A friend of mine has a son who works security at the mall and has worked with GPD there. He has said that many a time things could be handled peacefully without an arrest but many times the officer escalates the issue and makes an arrest. It seems like they do have an arrest mentality because they don't have the training or people skills to handle a problem in a different manner. Officers of your day Joe M. for the most part didn't go out of their way to mess with people. These guys nowadays also seem to be revenue producers for the town. Do they have certain quota's to meet as far as tickets and arrests?
I have also said we should do away with GPD and let the Sheriff's handle the town because GPD is a huge part of the budget. How much have they cost the town in lawsuits? Also they are the highest paid in the area according to the D&C. By making more arrests and writing more tickets and appearing in court they guarantee themselves overtime. They sure do make a whole lot more than you did in the day Joe. I think that sometimes contributes to the cockiness, young guy/girl making 100,000 a yr. All I know is in my situation things could have been handled differently. Don't want to get into it here and now but if you knew the story I'm sure you would agree that they were out of line and made an arrest because they know they were wrong. It was and has been a horrible life changing experience but when officers blatantly lie to cover their asses, well that's just plain wrong. As far as the judges, the one we were involved was rude, a hothead and clearly backing the officers up and putting in his own comments and opinion where they didn't belong. Guess he was taking care of his boys.

SCATS said...

To Joe M ~~ Nope, not presumptuous at all. It is your CONTENTION. It is YOUR belief, YOUR opinion, not mine and likely not many others who read this BLOG. Merely stating something as "fact" doesn't prove a thing. Facts need proof, evidence that supports it. Your track record here is marred by frequent memory and other lapses, so I won't merely take your word for it. Sorry.

Anonymous said...

Having lived the life for 3 plus decades and now retired, todays LE officers are in it for the pay and benefits period. In the past it was possible to make more money doing something else. My brothers who worked at Kodak thought that I was crazy working in the inner city filling up 2 sometimes 3 log sheets a night for 15 grand less than they were making. But its what I wanted to do. In my opinion todays cops are in it for the money and benefits and are afraid of the people they police. In the old days you brought something to the job other than a associates or bachelors degree, it was called life experience. These new cops forget where they came from who they are and what they took an oath to do.

Anonymous said...

I have been reading this thread for the last several days. Joe M. can rant and rave all he wants but our police department is corrupt. I thought when the NYS Police and FBI came in to investigate Rahn & Hairburger we would finally get our police department cleaned up. When they brought in Baxter I figured things would be different. Well he left for greener pastures and who did they put in charge???? None other than Phelan II. And he was the most qualified???? Give me a freaking break Joe M.

SCATS said...

To 6:39AM ~~ We've curtailed Joe M.'s postings after he expressed that he'd be "surprised" if we posted a specific one. We decided to really "surprise" him by halting his ranting altogether :)

Anonymous said...

6:39 and 11:17
Smoke doesn't always mean there's a conflagration, perhaps it's only a smoldering fire. If through all the allegations, investigations, chiefs, and purges nothing significant has been found then perhaps the truth is the truth - that there really is little wrong, the occasional hiring problem - result, prison sentences, accident involving drug use - result, prison sentence. You all seem to give these cops way too much credit if you think they're so smart as to circumvent the systems invoked to catch them but can't seem to get to the bottom of what you allege..

SCATS said...

To 6:38PM ~~ Or perhaps the truth is that real problem ... the underlying corruption ... is bigger than the Town of Greece itself! GPD's reputation is pretty well known despite Baxter's failed attempts to "fix" it. In fact, most of what he did has since been undone.

Anonymous said...

I totally agree with 6:01 PM: The GPD with the help of heavy handed union leaders has morphed into bloated tax sucking bottomless pit. Although I have run into a couple of bad apples on two occasions, there are many honest hard working cops on the force. However, the tax burden to support a 100+ police force and all their ancillary benefits, equipment, real estate, administrative support, vehicles and maintenance continues to cripple the average Greece tax payer. I don't believe anyone can justify the expenditure based on level of reported crime in this community.
The tax burden is further exacerbated by the egregious amount of allowable open check-book overtime that is the norm to keep everyone happy and motivated. I checked the public records and many GPD's have earned in access of between $125K and $150K on top of benefits. Yes, the job can be dangerous at times but Police work does not make the top ten most dangerous occupations.

The overtime and pension padding used to inflate life long pension payouts is as corrupt a "look the other way" rule as it gets. The unfortunate taxpayers will continue to be burdened with these padded pensions for life as most leave as soon as they are able to start collecting a pension to start a second career or double dip!!!! Retire after 20 years and collect pension and full health benefits for the next 40 years! This must change as we cannot afford this extravagance! Every so often, the news media reports on the exorbitant overtime and cost to local governments but never a follow-up to expose those responsible. How in the world can anyone justify and financially support a system where police, school superintendents, administrators, etc. are provided the means to earn more than the Governor of this state?
Here is one example and there are hundreds more:
"Thirteen agency police officers received more in salary, overtime and other payments in that period than did Executive Director Patrick Foye, whose annual salary is $289,000."
It is simply unbelievable that anyone can consciously put in 80-100+ hours every week and remain alert and functional. Don't these people have a life, family? Yes, we need a Police force, but the financial burden must be significantly reduced. When will the leaders of this town forget politics have the guts to break the unions strong-hold? Take a lesson from President Reagan's handling of the striking traffic controllers......They got the message - he fired all 11,000 of them!!

SCATS said...

To 8:41PM ~~ Well said.

Anonymous said...

And there are hundreds of candidates available.
Let us never forget the town board approves these contracts.

Anonymous said...

To 8:41

And then (aw shit moment) how many were immediately rehired? And the pay increased by what % for rehires, and we now have entry level pay of what?

Do the homework before posting crap! I made a fortune when I was rehired! And now have a pension exceeding that of most politicians involved in the debacle. Thanks Ronnie!!!

SCATS said...

To 5:47PM ~~ TY for raising our taxes. (sarcasm intended)