Saturday, November 22, 2014

Former Greece Cop Ponders Plea Deal



The case against former Greece Police officer, John Casey, who is accused of possessing child pornography, was adjourned in federal court.

Casey's attorney said he's considering a plea, but wants another 60 days to review the case with his client or the case will go to a federal grand jury.

Casey did not appear in court Friday. He lives in Iowa where he is under probation supervision.

Federal investigators during a two-year undercover federal investigation, they found several images of child pornography on computers traced to John Casey.

Casey was a former Greece police officer. He resigned in May. He was also previously employed with the Rochester Police Department.

On Friday, the judge approved Casey's travel request to visit family for the holidays. This case is scheduled to return to federal court January 27.


John Casey III, TWC News


16 comments:

Anonymous said...

Who these people really are is NOT a pleasant story!!! Corruption will always exist but a less evil system is possible, and much needed!!!

Anonymous said...

One must wonder if just delivering the punishment would stop the problems in our police system. What would happen if the police were held to the same standard as the rest of us?

Anonymous said...

Was this guy another "pass the trash" from RPD to Greece like Pignato? Why does GPD end up with a bunch of criminals on its police force? What a disgusting human being. I hope they lock him up and throw away the key.

Anonymous said...

He can always join GCSD's security force, trade one corrupt organization for another.

SCATS said...

To 8:01AM ~~ The better question might be: "Why do the criminals of RPD end up in GPD?"

Anonymous said...

Speaking of GCSD,, what crook is selling GCSD property on Craigslist?
""Two staircase units for sale, $250 each or best offer. Built for theater production but excellent for home or business installation as a base foundation. Solidly constructed by professionals according to code, each unit has fourteen 11" steps with 7" rise, approximately 98" span (8' 2"). Buyer must provide transportation from school storage site in Greece. A great deal for the right buyer! ""

SCATS said...

To 11:44AM ~~ TYVM!!

Anonymous said...

One might question the value of this thread in as much as this sicko is no longer a part of the community or state. This guy was a hire under Auburger' s corrupt
PAY TO PLAY FIRE SALE OF OPENINGS IN THE DEPARTMENT.
Since his departure, new hires have been hired off existing civil service lists. This has resulted in the hiring of new officers who actually live and have a vested interest in Greece the town they live in. Unfortunately under Auburger,all new hires were transfers from other departments from surrounding counties, some as far way as 35 miles away from Greece. Some still remain on the job and continue to live in distant towns and villages.Considering this fact, a Town Police Department it does not make.

SCATS said...

To 6:04PM ~~ If Greece cops weren't in the headlines on a regular basis, then questioning the value of this thread might be sensible. However, as we've come to see all too clearly, just because Rahn is gone doesn't mean everything is hunky dory. I'm waiting for the media to UPDATE US on the Manza case. Is he healing? Is he still in an induced coma? Has he been charged? When will the Grand Jury decision be expected? Etc. etc. etc ...

Anonymous said...

That is great news! Now that Auggie is gone the new chief and supervisor hire with Greece preference off a civil service list. The way it should be. Good rid-dens to the old gang.

SCATS said...

To 10:49PM ~~ You forget. LOTS of "the old gang" still work there ... including the chief.

Anonymous said...

In truth they are held to a higher standard than the general public just by the nature and public visibility of their profession. A fact that will follow them long after they retire and the rest if their lives.

SCATS said...

To 9:59AM ~~ That is your OPINION, not necessarily a truth. As we just heard in Ferguson, cops are given lots of leeway in their discretion on the job - in that case for the use of deadly force. Civilians don't get that same advantage ;)

After leaving the force, unless the cop notoriously screwed up (like a Rahn) then I don't see or hear anything to suggest what you put forth. So, show me.

SCATS said...

So quickly you respond! However, instead of SHOWING ME what was contended in the post at
11/26/2014 9:59 AM, you go on a rant about me! I'll take that to mean you can't SHOW ME.

Anonymous said...

Scats. This is9:59, my posted comment was directed at7:40 comment not your10:14 post that I had yet to read. I don't think we are on the same page as they were 4 days apart and not connected until I just read your recent post and your 10:14 today post which I never responded to until now. Apparently some one other than I, responded to my 9:59 post. I assure you that it was not me. However since you have now asked me to back up my response to 7:40, I will now elaborate on your challenge to MY OPINION,IN regard to my 9:59 post in hopes that we are both on the same page and dates
First off, let's talk local New York State Law, not Missouri.on authorized use of deadly force by police vs private citizens.
Under New York's CPL , criminal procedure law, a police officers is authorized to use appropriate use of deadly force when confronted with a situation that places HIS LIFE or the life of AN OTHER in danger of
death or serious injury.
An ordinary citizen may use deadly force to protect his life and those of his family. In both cases, the element of probable cause must be apparent and imminent Both require split second decisions to be made. In the case of citizen use of deadly force it has been upheld by the courts on the grounds that the citizen had reasonable grounds to believe that a person illegally on his property, constituted a threat to not only him but his entire family. So your contention that a private citizen does not posses the right to the use of deadly force as that of a police officer is incorrect.
An example of a police shooting happened not too long ago in Greece, when an officer shot a knife out of the hand of someone being threatened through an outside window,
Obviously this shoot did not result in a death but if it had, under the statute it would be
held to be justifiable as it was done in DEFENSE OF ANOTHER PERSON's LIFE.
Now this example leads me into my statement about a police officer being held to a higher standard even after leaving the job is related to the above mentioned situation involving an ordinary citizen. So using this situation confronting ordinary citizen vs ex citizen cop one could argue that the same condition apply to the retired officer . All though the same circumstances exists, the fact that he was an ex cop, clouds the picture and the word perceived enters the equation . I have seen this scenario play out in reality involving a former colleague of mine who retired and moved down state. He encountered the same situation involving a home invasion of his home by an intruder who he shot and killed the person who just happened to be person of color and he white. Although justified under every section of the statute, he was literally crucified by the local media when it was learned he was a former police officer. While it should have changed nothing, it did. The reason, he was a retired trained police officer and could have handled the situation differently and did not result in the death of the intruder You see, there remains the public perception that a former cop should be able to deal with a deadly force incident with a less deadly response.
If you haven't guessed by now that I too am a retired cop, is a fact. I recently retired from the RPD after 31 yrs in the job. And do you know one of the first things I did was to get rid of all my personal off- duty hand guns because as an retired cop, there use would only spell trouble for me even if justifiably used. Many ex cops have done the same for the same reason. Don't get me wrong , I still keep other mean in my home to protect my family just in case.

SCATS said...

To 3:26PM ~~ First of all, I NEVER contended that "a private citizen does not posses the right to the use of deadly force" ... I'm saying that the STANDARDS applied to a cop and a private citizen are NOT THE SAME under the law. Just as Phelan is TRYING to say they can do a "welfare check" when no one called for a welfare check, he's stretching the parameters of permission. In Ferguson, I heard the DA explain that a cop can use deadly force in a very broad way, compared to other states, as well as compared to use by a Mo. resident.

As for the example you gave of the downstate cop, I'd appreciate a link or two about that case, since it sounds so well covered and discussed. I would like to judge for myself if it sounds like the standard was different from the one that would be held in a case involving me or my civilian neighbor.

For the record, in Ferguson, I'm not necessarily disagreeing with the outcome, but I have a HUGE issue with the process, which they admit was vastly altered for this case. In fact, one person stated that since the Grand Jury was given ALL of the evidence, they got to "try" both sides & determine who was victim, who was suspect. That in itself reminds me of Phelan referring to Manza first as a victim, then immediately following as "the suspect." That sort of statement paints a certain negative image before it even gets to the Grand Jury.