Tuesday, August 26, 2014

BOE Study Session Tonight, 6:30PM


WATCH YOUR WALLET ALERT!!!

It is anticipated that the BOE will go into Exec. Session at 6:00 pm to discuss collective negotiations pursuant to article 14 of the Civil Service Law.

AGENDA ITEMS of NOTE


  • upgrade athletic facilities, 
  • build a bus wash facility 
  • & add storage! With enrollment falling under 11,000, they need to CLOSE MORE SCHOOLS! Then we will have PLENTY of "storage" space!





16 comments:

Anonymous said...

A bus washing facility males fiscal sense. Regular washing of the bus fleet will protect the taxpayer investment. This will be particularly true during the salting of the road seasons.

Maybe the District could go in with the Town for a joint facility with the town to lessen the initial budget hit.

SCATS said...

To 11:57AM ~~ OR maybe the Town could negotiate a discounted rate with the Daniele family at their new carwash!

Anonymous said...

If the the new car wash could handle a vehicle the size of a school bus, that might be a good solution as well.

Anonymous said...

This will add how much lifetime to a school bus? It will cost XX and will pay for itself in what timeframe?

SCATS said...

To 7:43PM ~~ Good question! I have another idea. All those kiddies who want to play sports ... let them wash the buses in return for district support.

Anonymous said...

The anticipated yearly operating cost of a bus wash will be?

SCATS said...

To 8:02AM ~~ If they allow the PTA to run it, they will NET tens of thousands! Plus there will be cookies & kool-aid while the bus drivers wait ;) lol

Anonymous said...

11:57 is right. As a retired mechanic from Hilton, I can relate to the value of a Bus washing facility, Hilton has had such a facility for many years. In fact, at one time, Greece experimented by sending some of their buses to our facility ten or so years ago.
School Buses are literally built like Tanks. They are the safest vehicles on our roads today. However, they are exposed to the elements such as weather and chemicals used to deal with it such as road salt.
Hand washing of the external components of the bus as some have suggested, does not do the job nor does it contribute to the safety and servibility and longevity of the bus.
The greatest damage occurs to the under carriage due to exposure to salt and other weather related causes. Obviuosly, we couldn't wash the under side as you could the cabin. What was needed was a system that provided high pressure spray to those vulnerable and Unreachable areas. A bus wash facility provided that in the same way today's modern car washes do.
The greatest damage happens in these areas. Brakes , brake lines, Gas lines etc. Suspension and frame damage as well as exposed engine parts. We saved thousands in repairs to these components as a result of flushing corrosive contaminants from these areas.Add to that tougher safety state inspection guide lines added as much as 2 years to the usable life of the bus The wash facility resulted in substantial dividends to the district in the long run. It would do the same for Greece.

SCATS said...

To 9:21AM ~~ In the "real" world, I completely get the common sense & logic of your comments. It is the approach I would take (and do take) towards my vehicles. In the world of GCSD though, there is a much different reality. While they MIGHT conveniently use your logic to get the bus wash supported, I can just about guarantee you it will NEVER ADD EVEN 1 DAY TO THE LIFE OF A BUS IN GREECE!!

How do I know this? I've listened to the grand pubas of our finance group talk about the Bus Proposition. Questions by the BOE about ways to extend the life of a bus were batted away with an argument that it was ALL about mileage and the age of the bus combined with state laws, rules, etc. "Once a bus hits the magical age or mileage, it must be retired ...

Cleanliness doesn't matter.

Anonymous said...

But SAFETY does. State inspectors retire more buses than your logic does, Its just the way things work today. This is the REAL world of today The mileage limits you speak of go to the issue of safety. A bus could only be five years old, but if it has 100k on it, unforeseen structural failures known as metal fatigue are a real and present danger and and therefore a possible safety issue. On the outside it( the bus) may look good, but in reality , structurally it is tired and worn out. This is not guess work.Metalurgical studies have shown this to be a fact, Another example of this fact are fleet vehicles as well as Police Vehicles which by the very nature of their use , could be the equivalent of junk after one year. It's not uncommon for a police car to accumulate 100k in one year operating 24/7 during that time. This is the reality that's taking place in this regard.

SCATS said...

To 2:37PM ~~ I'm sorry but I'm not buying into the idea of metal fatigue after 1 or even 5 years! Not with today's ability to make vehicles that last well beyond 10 years.

SCATS said...

I just did a quick bit of research about bus age before retirement. I see 8 to 10 yrs. as one breaking point and 10 to 12 years as another, depending on the type of bus. I also see that in some states, regulations permit school buses to accumulate 250,000 miles or be in service up to 15 years!

Anonymous said...

I can just now see the SCATS headline when a bus with 175K miles fails and injures 25 to 60 students! Just once SCAT's, defer to the wisdom of someone who's knowledge exceeds yours in a content area! This response is from someone who apparently knows vehicles, the Law, and liability. And as you've always replied to comments such as, "I just did a quick bit of research about bus age before retirement. I see 8 to 10 yrs. as one breaking point and 10 to 12 years as another, depending on the type of bus. I also see that in some states, regulations permit school buses to accumulate 250,000 miles or be in service up to 15 years!"
DON'T BELIEVE WHAT YOU GOOGLE!!!

Anonymous said...

Oh well, what the hell do I know. I only worked on school busses for over 31 yrs and attended several technical service seminars on school bus construction and maintenance as well as safety improvements that took place over that period of time. It would appear that you have more knowledge on the subject than I. But then again, I never claimed I knew everything. So be it.

SCATS said...

To 6:02PM ~~ Actually, I usually do believe what I Google, because I'm extremely able in my ability to find the desired info AND I'm quite picky about what references I use. In the above example, I am telling you info derived from a website by those who head up an Assn of the State Directors of Pupil Transportation Services, not Wikipedia.

I'll go with them over an anonymous comment poster anyday ;)

SCATS said...

To 6:56PM ~~ I learn something new everyday. Of course, with each passing day, things tend to change, too. I don't know how long ago you were working, but maybe things have changed since then.I am quite aware of the arguments used in the boardroom this past spring about the need to replace buses in Greece. That 10 year timeframe was cited repeatedly.