Tuesday, June 18, 2013

Too Many Teachers, Too Poorly Trained


Scathing Report Criticizes Teacher Factories
For Churning Out Lousy Product


Findings include gems like this: Only a quarter of education programs limit admission to students in the top half of their high school class. The remaining three quarters of programs allow students who fared poorly in high school to train as teachers.

SCATS ~~ I've always said, it doesn't take a rocket scientist to become a teacher! Now, I have backing :)
  

20 comments:

Anonymous said...

All I've gotta do is stay one page ahead of the kids!

Anonymous said...

Schools of Education are Academic Fraud. It's been proven over & over for 20 years and more.

Sadly the matriculated frauds don't know they are frauds.
The system just needs to be flushed.

Anonymous said...

The report pointed out that we have three people looking for each teaching job.Why do we always pick the poor ones?

Anonymous said...

It is called capitalism.......many on this blog are big fans of capitalism , right? Supply and demand......for profit organizations, Wall Street, the list goes on and on. Sadly, the true statistic is that in the 70's the top 5 % of a graduating HS class got into education. Today it happens to be the bottom 5% of a graduating class. The consequence is that ,mediocre students that become mediocre teachers, create and support mediocrity in students, staff and community.

Hee is scenario that I am all to familiar with. I attended a decent University to get a degree but so did Jane Smith. Our tuition is in the tens of thousands of dollars. Regardless of whether I am better or not, we will both graduated and our grades will have little to use when it came to being hired. It is a conspiracy if you are to believe that they matter because they don't. I graduated with a flat out idiot, fraud, cheater, and she has a job and I don't. Where is the justice in that?

SCATS said...

To7:23PM ~~ I wouldn't call the bottom 5% of a graduating class "mediocre." I'd call them in need of remediation.

Anonymous said...

I agree with 5:09. The whole system is a joke. We need to focus on the basics, real life important stuff as well as advanced academics for those who want it. I was forced to take 4 years of math, 3 year of science ,2 years foreign language. I did graduate in the bottom 10% of my class because I knew I wanted to be a mechanic. I took every shop class there was. I joined the Army and furthered my trade. I can build an entire house fix anything in or out of my house including my car. But did poorly in school because I was forced to take trig and physics. So I went to the class but did nothing and failed them. I am totally self sufficient.

Anonymous said...

Question: What do you call the guy that graduates last in his class at medical school?

Answer: "Doctor"

SCATS said...

To 9:36PM ~~ Maybe you call him (her) doctor, but I certainly won't! It pays to check out who you are going to allow to treat you & your family. Many resources exist to help do it.

Anonymous said...

A big part of the problem is the whole concept of studying education in order to be a teacher, instead of studying subject matter. The theory seems to be that when it comes to teaching kids, the hard part is not knowing math or history or English, but knowing how to relate to the various stages of development of the kids themselves.

Anyone with established skills in a field can teach as an adjunct at a community college, or even our flagship schools (RIT, UR). But they can’t teach high school.

When I went to school during the Coolidge administration my best teachers (in math, science, and computers) were all professionals with corporate jobs who came to the school two or three days a week to teach part-time, then spent the rest of their week at their real jobs. I’ve looked into doing the same today, but no dice. Unless you are a certified member of the education establishment, you are not allowed to teach in our public schools. At universities, sure, but not in high school.

SCATS said...

To 4:40AM ~~ During the Coolridge Administration there were no computers! Was the abacus around yet?? lol

As for the certification requirement, I think it's time has come and gone.

Realistically, all it takes to teach is a motivated teacher and a curious student. Think of all of the things we've taught our children BEFORE they entered school. Think of all the accomplishments (and usually at younger ages) of students who are home-schooled. Think of the angst of the union in reading my last few sentences ;)

Anonymous said...

I've looked all over and can't find anywhere that shows me where a doctor graduated in his/her class. Can someone share a resource that does this?

Anonymous said...

OK! Motivation to teach is a prerequisite for a teacher. However, curious, interested students being motivated to learn, are becoming an endangered species in Greece. Most seem more curious about what goes where and when and with whom.
Motivated curiosity in action.

SCATS said...

To 3:18PM ~~ I'm wondering YOUR ranking in your HS class. Why don't you simply ask him?

PS ~~ Doctors who fail to get published, do research, sit on professional boards, go for additional training, etc. might not be one of the brightest bulbs in the pack!

The onus is on YOU to determine if your Doc is well-educated, trained properly, etc. Just because he uses the Davinci robot in the surgical suite does NOT mean he's been trained for it and/or successful using it. You must ask!

SCATS said...

To 3:46PM ~~ Sadly, it appears that most of Greece's K-2 teachers are well-versed in quashing all visible signs of curiosity, eagerness to learn, etc. very early on. It prepares them for a day of sitting in a chair, staring at a blackboard while the "teacher" recites what they call a lesson plan ... delivered in a monotone. As long as the student doesn't snore, they are considered to be well-behaved.

SCATS said...

By the way 3:18PM ~~ If your Doc attended med school outside of the US, it MIGHT be a clue that he was NOT among the best or brightest ;)

Anonymous said...

What if it's not MY doc I'm curious about? What if I want to "shop around"? Where is there a site on which I can see where a whole BUNCH of doctors finished respectively in their class? Anyone? (It's obvious that SCATS doesn't know,)

SCATS said...

To 5:23PM ~~ Then make those phone calls & ask those questions. I don't think anyone said anything about "a site" where you could check class standing.

You can check licensing, educational background, specialty & other info here:
http://www.nydoctorprofile.com/

SCATS said...

PS 5:23PM ... you owe me an apology ;)

Anonymous said...

Which college programs DO limit their programs to the top 15%? Which programs are then available to the bottom 15%?

SCATS said...

To 6:05PM ~~ I have no idea. Not sure if such a list exists. But I am aware that there are certain programs at specific schools that limit applicants to those with specific credentials, be it class ranking, SAT scores, etc. I'm pretty sure the bottom 15% won't gain entry into an MIT computer engineering program, or the Harvard Law School either.