Thursday, June 20, 2013

Greece School Enrollments Still Tanking


Only 11,029 students as of this month.

Jamie Warren, assistant superintendent for human resources blames decline on an aging population, young people leaving the area, and parents choosing to send their students to private schools.

"I think that Greece residents are such loyal people. They love the schools." ~~ Jamie Warren

"I don't look at it as a positive thing that enrollment is declining. I want families to say, 'Greece is where I want to raise my children and [is a place] where they will get an excellent education.'" ~~ Julia VanOrman, BOE Prez.

STORY

SCATS ~~ Greece parents, do you really "love Greece schools?" (That's not something I've heard from any parent in at least three years! )

Ms. Warren: Why would parents opt for private schools if they "love Greece schools"??
 

12 comments:

Anonymous said...

Hmm...now I'm wondering why I was told that enrollment levels were maxed out when I requested a transfer to another school for my kids (due to a bullying situation that wasn't being handled like it should have been), and that it was just not possible. A battle I've been fighting since September. I also thought that there was a ZERO TOLERANCE and a bullying program this year...what a joke!

Anonymous said...

Greece used to be the District that everyone wanted their kids to get an education. Then Walts took over and ran the District into the ground as well as bankrupting it, while the BOE sat back and watched. Since then there has been one incompetent super after another and families are fleeing Greece in droves. The town as well as the District are the laughing stock of Monroe county, and there looks like there is no end in sight.

Anonymous said...

The Greece Post wonders what the response will be. I propose that we downsize the schools (and staff) to the numbers that are needed to educate the number of students we have and the number we propose to have in the ext several years. Isn't that what nay responsible business would plan to do?

Anonymous said...

We mustn’t buy in to the administration/union/BOE view that this is anything less than a cause for celebration. Fewer students means lower costs.

If we allow them to spin the narrative to where we seek more enrollment, then illegal students will be the natural recruiting pool. Where else can you find as large a population from which you can expand right away?

SCATS said...

To 1:25AM ~~ Let's not forget that some schools already have a hefty percentage of illegal students attending AND STILL the numbers are declining. Time to close another 2 schools, reduce the number of teachers and the number of buses.

Anonymous said...

I kind of got that same impression from a recent article in the Greece Post. I think the headline was something like, "Greece grapples with declining enrollments". What's there to grapple with? This is an oppertunity for cost savings, period. What should be grappled with, however, is what our district has become. Perhaps it was inevitable, given our shared border with the city. That said, we certainly could/can do more to keep the illegals out. I would like to see the exact figures as far as how many illegals have been nabbed and kicked out.

SCATS said...

To 8:22AM ~~ My understanding is that they gave up trying to nab & kick out any of them, thus the troubles. You see, they really don't care because NYS gives them the state aid for those kids too, no problem. They have NO incentive to oust them!

Anonymous said...

Oh, there's an incentive SCATS, but nobody at DO wants to step up and say it... Performance of OUR students. Do our school's demographics reflect our town's (not our mall's) demographics. "Water always seeks its own level" is a theory I think fits the situation well. Hypothetically, if we had a sudden influx of illegal students arrive from Pittsford, I would expect OUR students to strive to do better, like those new students in their class. Bring in a bunch of kids from one of the State's worst performing districts, and our students/schools performance slide in that direction. There are a low percentage of kids that sit in the category of either highly gifted or very "slow", the rest sit somewhere in the middle and could eventually slip to one side or the other. When we atrifically increase the percentage of the "slow" performers, their performance becomes more normal and acceptable. The result is the average students in that class (that could have gone either way), find the new level.

SCATS said...

To 9:42AM ~~ Student performance is only an incentive IF the classroom teachers care! In fact, in districts with HIGH EXPECTATIONS, the performance levels achieved rise despite demographics. In Greece, I'm not sure DO staffers even care ... not in reality.

Anonymous said...

Jamie Warren sounds really intelligent.

Anonymous said...

Scats, once again you assume that all the high expectation lies with the classroom teacher, when there is always a weak link to offset the expectation. Most likely it is always the administration that is the weak link. How many times have you heard that and still care to believe what you want to believe. We, the teachers, are only as strong as our leaders. We really do have very little say as to what goes on in the classroom other than some right to teach as we like, and that sometimes gets trumped. So believe what you want but have some insight ( knowledge) because you really are starting to sound like you drink the kool aid too.

SCATS said...

To 6:50AM ~~ Sorry, but you don't get to pass the buck that fast! Admin isn't in the classroom, but the teachers are. Teachers should have regular ongoing student contact, interaction, etc. Admin should not.

What I believe, and know, is that in Greece, teachers love to complain about admin, but God forbid should any of you ever aspire to become a principal or other "leader" of the "weak." Yes, the teachers are the weak link ... even with the big, bad union to back them up ;)