Sunday, January 13, 2013

GCSD Teacher Absenteeism Report


TEACHER ABSENCES HURT STUDENT ACHIEVEMENT

D&C Reports on Greece Central School District Teacher Absences, 2009-2012

Facts for 2009 through October 2012:
  • About 8% of Greece teachers are absent on any given day
  • Greece teachers miss 16 school days per 180 day school year (on average)
  • The most common days for Greece teachers to be absent for all reasons were Thursdays and Fridays. The most common days for them to be out sick were Tuesdays and Fridays.*
  • About 10 Greece teachers per year were absent for more than half of the 180-day school year.
  • Substitute teacher costs average $1.8 million/yr.
  • Medical documentation is required from anyone who takes more than 5 days off in a row, or uses more than 3 sick days during any two-month period.
“You know, it’s harder to be out sick than be in school when you’re sick. You have to leave plans and hope the sub they bring in is someone who can pull it off: you’re putting in three to four hours of planning just to be out. So many times, you say ‘why put that time into planning?’ and just drag yourself in to do it.” ~~ Don Pallozzi, GTA president

Greece Teacher Absences, 2009 to Oct. 2012 ~  by day of the week and excuse code.

SCATS ~~ Well, well, well!! The GTA Prez. has admitted exactly what many have suspected for a very long time: many teachers have NO prepared lesson plan at the ready!

*  Interesting to note since most pre-planned school closings are on Mondays & Fridays. So if school is closed on Friday, taking Thursday off provides a nice, long weekend.
  

27 comments:

Anonymous said...

Well it seems reasonable to me that they have no "plans on the ready". Many teachers have "emergency plans" that are meant to be deployed because they did not expect to be absent. However, it isn't possible to have exact lesson plans ready for months, because the school year (where the class is and what is to be covered), is unpredictable. I believe you're manipulating the language here SCATS, and I know teachers do spend a great amount of time with plans for the subs if they realize they will be out in advance.

Anonymous said...

That is not what he said. I suggest you read it again. Of course you won't as you managed to put your usual negative SPIN on what he actually meant. So typical of how you manage to twist the facts by putting your own interpretation on a statement so as to fit your personal agenda.

Anonymous said...

I'm pretty sure they don't get paid for the holiday unless they work the day before and day after.

SCATS said...

To 3:38PM ~~ With no plans at the ready, how can a teacher know or show they are addressing the prescribed curriculum? How can you organize your teaching? How can you address student needs? Lesson plans are a great tool to COMMUNICATE those and other ideas.

To 4:42PM ~~ I read it again, just for you. It says exactly what I said it does. Your anger is NOT surprising. I just finished reading the predictably defensive comments posted to the D&C's story. I laughed when someone dared to suggest we need to pay teachers OT for professional development, etc. It's absolutely hysterical to hear a SALARIED "professional" b*tch about wanting OT pay that usually goes to less well educated hourly workers ;)

Anonymous said...

When I taught for GCSD, I was required to have two sets of "absentee lesson plans" on file. One was for "unexpected" (emergency) absences (death in the family, illness, etc.). This had to be "subject-related" but not necessarily about the topic that was currently being studied.


The second type of absentee lesson plan was for when I was going to be absent for a "known" reason (conference, operation, etc.). This had to be very detailed and "timely" (about the topic currently being studied).

Anonymous said...

Whenever I was going to be absent, I had to leave a lesson plan that was w-a-y more "detailed" than the lesson plan I'd use if I were going to be in the classroom.


A sub generally does not have much knowledge about the "inner workings" of the school, the school day, how things operate (attendance, etc). Since I did have that knowledge, my lesson plan needed to address only the subject area.

Anonymous said...

along with all that the number of absences on average is misleading due to the inclusion of maternity leave and extended illness. For these absences the school gets a certified teacher in that area so that the lessons provided are quite good and done by someone that knows the subject. I would like to see the number recalculated removing maternity leave, extended illness and district mandated professional development. That would give the real picture of the per teacher absenteeism rate.

Anonymous said...

This is 3:18. SCATS, you can be addressing the curriculum, however, I am saying it is impossible to pinpoint where you will be at during it. One class may be 10 pages ahead of the other classes because of some incident at school, maybe a discussion got to involved compared to the other. I'm just saying you need to realize that things happen (on a good note), inside a classroom. Are you a teacher? Have you ever been a teacher? I think before these blind sheep continue to follow you they need to ask themselves that. YOU HAVE NEVER BEEN A TEACHER! What gives you the right to break them down?

Anonymous said...

Absolutely ridiculous!
Teachers always want to be compared to other professionals with advanced degrees when it comes to income. Imagine any group of professionals, aside from teachers, who could have an absentee rate approaching 9% and still keep their jobs. This is a chronic problem that will never be fixed in NY.
Teacher contracts are entirely one-sided and will only get worse. The Tribourough Amendment guarantees that.

SCATS said...

To 8:44PM ~~ You say you are 3:18, but there is NO 3:18 ;) lol

Of course I'm a teacher. Every parent is their child's first teacher :) Many parents homeschool without needing ANY DEGREE!!Additionally, I've trained many people on-the-job ... and it was only a portion of the entire job I was expected to do.

To 8:57PM ~~ I agree completely.

Anonymous said...

Check out what Steve Achramovitch is doing in Hamburg.
Hamburgwatchdog.com

Anonymous said...

too often when teachers are absent, the lesson plan is to "show a video". Not much planning there.

Anonymous said...

I'm not angry I'm not even a teacher. I was simply pointing out the norm on this site for twisting the facts thru totally biased interpretations on you part as well as others who seem comfortable with letting you do their thinking for them. So sad.

Anonymous said...

How often is "too often"?

Anonymous said...

Poor teachers. They work so hard and get little pay.

PLEASE!!!!

They get more vacation time. And still they complain. So why become teachers???? If any other employee missed that much time off, they would be booted.

SCATS first you piss off GPD, then the firemen, and now the teachers.

Keep up the good work.

Anonymous said...

What does it say about administration who would include professional development as part of absenteeism. That makes no sence. Why would Palozzi just sit there and let it happen?
What does administration feel an acepable level of absenteeism? How many did not get raises due to absenteeism?

Anonymous said...

1:53-What do you mean "NOW the teachers"? SCATS has been pissing off the teachers since DAY ONE!

Anonymous said...

In most lines of work there is planning you do for yourself, in your own notes and shorthand, and plans you do for someone else to follow, which have to be much more detailed. Would you expect someone else to be able to understand and carry out your "to do list"?

SCATS said...

To 1:53PM ~~ Actually, I PO'd teachers first going back 8 years.

Anonymous said...

Good Lord, planning isn't that big of thing when you teach at GCSD. My mentor showed me how she did it, and I've been doing the same system the nine years I've been here

Years 1 through 3 are tough, you don't have tenure so you have to work down from 555. Days to
Tenure 554, 553, 552 etc.
You also have to plan on days till payday and Days off left so you leave some in the old time bank.

Once you get tenure it's just days to pay day.

I mean come on, nobody expects these kids to learn squat. You just blather about Martin Luther King and dumb stuff like that.

Tom Kackmeister said...

665It is not clear if the "cost" of absenteeism reported in the D and C included the cost of permanent substitutes. A few years ago the district did not include those costs in the budget as substitute costs. I sent the following to the district in hopes of clarifying this question.

TO THE SCHOOL DISTRICT:
Does the teacher attendance data published in the D and C this week include the costs of permanent substitutes? Please forward this to whomever supplied the data to the D and C and also copy your answer to the school board and M McDermittt (D and C McDermot ).. Thanks

Tom Kackmeister

Anonymous said...

If classroom behavior was not out of control perhaps learning could take place with a sub. I can only speak to HS classrooms. I can tell you that the long term sub was qualified but has had many behavior issues, and as far as I am concerned the issue is lack of consequences for the offenders. If you knew half of the non sense that happens at Athena you would agree. I first take issue with the administration for being friends first with students and not the authority figures that we pay them to be.

Anonymous said...

8:56 It is required that all teachers have lesson plans ready for the week at least of teaching. They are available to that teacher and the teacher's supervisor, the principal, for immediate review. If a teacher is not at school for a planned absence or an emergency, the sub will have access to those plans.
They cannot have shorthand or special codes that only the teacher can understand.
If teachers are saying they are only creating lesson plans for subs that is not in compliance with the expectation. Or is it different in Greece?

SCATS said...

To 10:47AM ~~ This is Greece where children come last. My suspicion is that many teachers here fail to create any "lesson plan." The proof is in the chaos that ensues when a sub arrives. Videos are the great cover-up method chosen by many to hide the fact there IS NO LESSON PLAN. If there was one, a video wouldn't be the panacea for so many teacher absences.

Sometime ago, it was my understanding that teachers in most districts had to have a plan ready in the event a principal came in and wanted to take over teaching ... but I learned a year or so ago that Rochester City teachers were so unlikely to have a lesson plan that the Supt. began depending upon feedback from the subs about how detailed those plans were to hold the teachers accountable when absent. At least in the short run, it caused teacher absences to DECLINE significantly ;)

Charlie Hubbard said...

Do we know what the 'goal' is of the board and administration with ongoing contract negociations to improve on the absenteeism rate and costs?

SCATS said...

Charlie ~~ There's been nothing said about the teacher's contract in months. I don't think it's on their radar, their schedule or included in any set of goals. It merely gives them an excuse to call an Executive Session so they can conduct district business behind closed doors.

Anonymous said...

Are we certain the students are worse off if the treacher is absent?