Wednesday, May 23, 2012

Appropriate Behavior?

Or A Train Wreck
Waiting To Happen?

Should school district's develop policies restricting, or even banning, teachers and/or other employees from contacting students via "Social Media" like Twitter, Facebook &  text messaging?

What about students contacting teachers, coaches, principals and other employees?

If so, where and how do we draw the line?
  



11 comments:

Anonymous said...

CRAYOLA

It's even an american made product.
Factory in Allentown Pa.

Anonymous said...

They should be allowed to but not with their own personal account. I am aware of two possible fights that were avoided due to a teacher monitoring student's comments back and forth to each other. Also a good way to be available to students who have questions about work assigned.

SCATS said...

To 7:27PM ~~ How can a teacher monitor a student's comments when cells can't be used in school? The entire menu of social media options is a very slippery slope especially for a teacher. Districts can monitor email that comes and goes via district owned computers, but personal electronic devices leave teachers open for possible accusations, criminal charges and lawsuits about inappropriate behavior.

Anonymous said...

The less contact teachers have with students, the better!

SCATS said...

To 5:47AM ~~ I hope you mean outside of the classroom ;) lol

Anonymous said...

Most schools have a Fraternization Policy (whether GCSD does or not, I don't know). This would address this type of contact --- but, as we have learned with other situations, policies are only as good as the paper they are written on if they aren't enforced.

SCATS said...

To 11:48AM ~~ I just looked and see nothing like that in GCSD's policy book. Of course what they post online is extremely dated, rendering it nearly worthless. Maybe that's why they ignore their own rules ...?

Anonymous said...

Social Media, Facebook et al, are like knives. When used properly, they can be useful. When used improperly, they can cause harm.

I feel that sites such as Facebook and Google+, aren't set up for the appropriate social distance that is part of a healthy student/teacher relationship.

I believe that there is potential for a social media type site designed for teachers to work with students, in groups or individually. While there is currently some distance learning software out there, it is no where near as ubiquitous as Facebook or even internet chat.

Anonymous said...

I agree with 9:59. Too much chance for a down side when teachers cross the line and move beyond teacher and start assuming the role of parent to the students.

jasper said...

here's a link to an example of a typical school policy governing fraternization.

http://www.tusd.org/InformationNews/Departments/HumanResources/NonFraternizationPolicy/tabid/1166/Default.aspx

SCATS said...

To 7:58AM ~~ It seems to me that from what is said at BOE meetings that the district already thinks they ARE the parents. I've sometimes heard praise for a few "good students" but I've yet to ever hear a good word about any Greece parents.