Saturday, May 07, 2011

60 Years of Teaching Math in the USA, 1950-2010

  
1. Teaching Math In the 1950s
A logger sells a truckload of lumber for $100. His cost of production is 4/5 of the price. What is his profit ?

2. Teaching Math In the 1960s
A logger sells a truckload of lumber for $100. His cost of production is 4/5 of the price, or $80. What is his profit?

3. Teaching Math In the 1970s
A logger sells a truckload of lumber for $100. His cost of production is $80. Did he make a profit ?

4. Teaching Math In the 1980s
A logger sells a truckload of lumber for $100. His cost of production is $80 and his profit is $20. Your assignment: Underline the number 20.

5. Teaching Math In the 1990s
A logger cuts down a beautiful forest because he is selfish and inconsiderate and cares nothing for the habitat of animals or the preservation of our woodlands. He does this so he can make a profit of $20. What do you think of this way of making a living? Topic for class participation after answering the question: How did the birds and squirrels feel as the logger cut down their homes? (There are no wrong answers, and if you feel like crying, it's ok.)

6. Teaching Math In 2010
Un hachero vende una carretada de maderapara $100. El costo de la producciones es $80. Cuanto dinero ha hecho?
     

8 comments:

Anonymous said...

Hilarious! I was just complaining about the ridiculous math in Greece.....

Anonymous said...

Thank you. That is so true. Funny. Best laugh of the day so far.

Anonymous said...

Now I know why my kid does not understand Math Investigations. He/She tells me "It's like they are speaking spanish." Now I know. Way to go Greece!!

Anonymous said...

love it, so sad tho...

Anonymous said...

Sad. Funny. True.

Who is to blame?

Anonymous said...

The ones to blame are those in charge who rammed the Connected math down everyone's throats. Connected Math was designed to complement a traditional math program. Walts & his successors were devotees to this program.
It got so bad that for a while the teachers were directed to teach specific lessons on specific days & were harassed if they did not follow the program exactly.

If you want to improve outcomes, give the teachers a list of specific competencies that the kids need to master at the start of the year. We pay the staff well so let them figure what they need to do to get the kids there. Keep the micro managers in the suits out of their hair. Test at the end of the year & then you can really see where your superior teachers are.

This approach could work in all subject areas, not just math.

Anonymous said...

Hardly true. In the 1950s, less than 50% of HS students completed math courses past algebra.

SCATS said...

To 10:06AM ~~ Can you show us anything to back that up? I'm not doubting you. I really don't know. The item posted is one of those email things people forward. Thank you.