Monday, March 22, 2010

How Much Do We Pay To Bus Kids?

   
How Much Do We Get Reimbursed?

Anonymous said...
Are there any numbers out there on bussing costs? I've heard we get reimbursed 85 cents on the dollar...anyone else have any numbers?    3/22/2010 2:58 PM
  

9 comments:

Anonymous said...

In my opinion it really doesn`t matter if we`re reimbursed or not, yet alone how much. If we are, then that`s extremely irresponsible by the state, allowing that money to be blown in exchange for no measurable benefit or results. Likewise, it would be wrong of us as a district to spend it `just because it`s there to be spent`. Frankly it`s that `spend it before we lose it` mentality that`s help to put our state in it`s present situation. Unfortunately, our district functions under that same greedy mind set. The hell with results, let`s get all the `free` money we can. Sad.

Charlie Hubbard said...

9:18 you discribed the public education monopoly very well driven by the entitlement mentality. Add this to (as one poster put it) supporting 'fetish' programs over 'educational' and 'affordable' programs brings us to the mess we have today.

Anonymous said...

To 9:18PM..........Bingo!

Anonymous said...

I agree with 9:18 completely! Taxing entities only have money to reimburse other taxing authorities by taxing us, the taxpayers. It's not reimbursement; it's giving us back some of our tax dollars. Of course, each taxing entity takes some "off the top" to manage the tax revenue before they send it back down the food chain. Not very efficient.

Anonymous said...

But still it would be good to know. And if, no when, we get reimbursements does that money get used for anything at all when we get the check from the state?
Remember when we passed the 119.5 million dollar bond in 1999 and they said we would get state aid at 70% for all those projects. But we had to pay as if we had borrowed 119.5 million dollars? When did we ever see the 70% from the state?

SCATS said...

To 11:14AM ~~ I not only remember that incident, but I recall similar situations when we spent $$ on technology propositions, bus purchases, etc. The "rebates" simply evaporate from the taxpayer's awareness!

Anonymous said...

We could try this:
http://www.urlesque.com/2010/03/23/girl-rides-zipline-to-school/?icid=main|htmlws-main-n|dl5|link6|http%3A%2F%2Fwww.urlesque.com%2F2010%2F03%2F23%2Fgirl-rides-zipline-to-school%2F

Anonymous said...

The little secret the public isn't supposed to know about that State Aid money is that it drifts in over a period of 10 years or so, and somehow never gets used to retire CIP bonds in School Districts.

Taxpayers get hoodwinked to borrow a Million, and District taxpayers get shafted to pay back a Million + interest over 20 or 30 years. The State Aid money comes to the District and hides so it can be used for other purposes.

Hey, guess who pays State Taxes? Get the feeling you pay at least TWICE? You're right if you do.

I'm offering a PRIZE
Free lunch at MickeyDs to anybody who can find a GCSD Bond that was retired early using State Aid.
I know it ain't much, but I pay taxes in Greece and its all I can afford.

Anonymous said...

I have worked for nonprofits and here's a strategy that is often employed:

1. Announce cuts in several areas. See who yells the loudest. Reinstate those. This is a great tool for management that is afraid to make the wrong decision.

2. Announce that you are considering cuts in areas that you have no intention of cutting, but that you know will cause a huge outcry. Use this as a fundraising opportunity as people come forward to save something you had no intention of getting rid of in the first place. Free money! Free publicity! Quietly use this money to avoid cuts that you were indeed going to make in other areas.

In both cases, you can spin it to look like you are being "responsive to needs" when it really means that you don't want to make a decision that will make you look like a bad guy.