Thursday, August 20, 2009

How Teachers Hold Parents Hostage For Student Grades ...

Anonymous said...

Scats here is the perfect example of those points kids earn for nothing, look at the BONUS ITEMS! Really p-me off!

7th Grade ASL – Level 1A
􀂾 Minimal 2 GB Thumb Drive (label with Student’s name) for ASL Class Only
􀂾 1 subject spiral notebook
􀂾 1 ½ inch 3 ring binder
􀂾 1 package loose leaf paper
􀂾 6 index tabs for Binder
􀂾 Highlighters (2 different colors)
􀂾 Color pencils
􀂾 2 glue sticks
􀂾 Pencils (#2 & pens)
􀂾 Notebook size 3 hole punch (extra)10

Optional Extra’s for the general class use (5 bonus points for each optional supply)
􀂾 1 box of tissues
􀂾 1 hand sanitizer
􀂾 1 bottle Clorox clean up wipes
􀂾 3 blank writeable CD’s (for storage of video portfolio Data)
Summer Reading Books / Book Reports
􀂾 A Season of Change, by Lois L. Hodge

8/20/2009 2:27 PM

SCATS ~~ So much for the idea (and the law) of offering a FREE public education! You can literally buy a better grade in GCSD. Not to mention 5 extra points for a box of Kleenex is a much better "buy" than actually having to read and write a book report!

25 comments:

Anonymous said...

...at least they recommend Clorox brand products..it's American made ;).

Anonymous said...

The education is free - not the supplies. My kid has had a similar list each year. If you need help and can not afford certain supplies, the school will help you (and often the teacher will purchase supplies for the kids that can not afford it).

Stop crying and buy the damn supplies. If whiners like you didn't b*@#h and moan (and often refuse to buy supplies) - the teachers wouldn't need to come up with incentives to get the kids to bring in what they should have brought in to begin with.

SCATS said...

To 3:14PM ~~ The fact that teacher's offer EXTRA CREDIT for blank writable CDs & Clorox wipes isn't related to the school supply requirements! It's bribery, pure and simple ;)

SCATS said...

By the way, show me a list that EVER states that the school will help people who can't afford the supply costs. Do they start those kids with 5 points off for each item they can't afford?

With a budget of $195 million, you'd think that hand sanitizer would be included in a year when swine flu is expected to become epidemic. What's next? Bring your own toilet paper?

Anonymous said...

Nice attitude 3:14. I'll bet that you're either a teacher or your kids play hockey ........

Anonymous said...

I sent that to SCATS!

Whoa 3:14 are you the ASL teacher?
It is not about buying supplies, it is that the "donations" or extras are awarded points. It is wrong!

And don't give me it is becasue of parents like me that the teachers have to buy supplies. It is becasue of parents like me that send in supplies that are used as COMMUNITY resources that many kids have tools to use.

And I never refuse to buy supplies, and I gladly send in tissues and hand sanatizer and other extras, NOT because it is worth points, but becasue I want to help out and can afford to. BIG DIFFERANCE!

And with out the huge benefit packages of our GTA members there just might be some money in teh budget for CLOROX WIPES.

(BTW, my DH is a teacher, not public but well paid and compensated, and even he agrees the contracts are bankrupting the school system and tax payers)

Anonymous said...

Nice attitude 3:25. Booyeah!

Anonymous said...

I can't believe what I'm reading here! Please tell me that teachers don't give "extra credit" for actually doing schoolwork!! Since when are book reports optional, but thumb drives mandatory? No wonder we can't graduate more than 80% of our students!

SCATS said...

To 3:31PM ~~ I tend to see 3:25PM's point ... the comments posted by 3:14PM reveal a pretty big chip on someone's shoulder.

SCATS said...

To 3:28PM ~~ I agree that it is wrong. There should be NO CONNECTION between grades and supply lists. And there certainly should not be any connection between book reports and supply lists either. When did book reports become "optional?"

Anonymous said...

If I just send in a whole case of wipes, can my kid get A's for the year without bothering to attend? Maybe if I send in a case of kleenex, he can just graduate! lol!!!!!!

Anonymous said...

Sam's Club Membership $25
Bulk Box Clorox wipes $15
Case Kleenex $12
Guaranteed graduation with High Honor Roll PRICELESS!

Anonymous said...

Try the high school AP classes.The kids have to buy the books for the class at $20.00 to $30.00 a pop, and pay $85.00 for each AP test.

Anonymous said...

This is one of the problems with local funding of public schools. Imagine a teacher sending a school list like this home in an economically disadvantaged community (RCSD, Greece(??)) and then imagine them sending the same list to an economically advantaged community (Pittsford, Brighton).

So students in economically disadvantaged communities are faced with poor school infrastructure, limited school-based supplies (i.e. textbooks, lab materials, etc.), and also "normal" supplies usually provided by families.

I definitely get what 3:14 is saying - Greece is not an economically disadvantaged community overall and if some families have trouble getting all their supplies, the teachers will definitely help them out.

PS - The cost of AP tests are not connected to local school budgets in any way - it is an independent organization which sets its own prices. Yeah.. $85 is SO MUCH to pay especially when a 4 or 5 on the exam will be worth three credits at the college level... what's a credit going for at the U of R these days? ;) Plus $20-$30 for books! The horror... go to a college bookstore and see what they are charging there. AP is the best value in education going.

SCATS said...

To 5:01PM ~~ There is a huge difference between asking and/or expecting parents to provide paper, pencils, crayons & scissors and asking them to send in gadgets to support technology (thumb drives and CDs) and janitorial supplies (Clorox wipes!). There is also a huge difference between "requesting" cooperation and "buying" it with bonus points!

The concept of issuing extra credit for providing communal supplies is ethically reprehensible and allows the economically "advantaged" to earn credit towards a grade which the economically "disadvantaged" can not! That is clearcut discrimination based upon a parent's ability to pay. I also suspect it is a practice that is illegal.

I believe your comment about AP exams is somewhat misleading in that GCSD gets proctoring fees via those exam costs which it pays to teachers. It is a little known fact that "needy" students can take these exams for about half the fee charged ... GCSD must forego their cut. It can also be very difficult to ascertain ahead of time whether any given college will grant credit for these exams. I'm personally familiar with just such a case! (and so is my wallet!)

SCATS said...

Oh, and one more thing ... AP class or not, parents should not be expected or asked to provide texts (i.e. curriculum) for AP classes. If the district can't support the class, it shouldn't offer it. Same as for extra-curriculars ;)

Anonymous said...

Your right, AP is the best value going. Its to bad that the "free education" Greece provides is not not such a great value.

SCATS said...

To 6:17PM ~~ It is only a good value if your kid gets college credit for it ;)

Based upon your writing, I'm guessing you may not have been an AP scholar ...

Anonymous said...

If student learning is the goal,you would think that the district would spend tax dollars on the students instead of creating positions like the energy czar position. 70k to walk around the schools and turn lights out,must be nice.I thought that the district already had a energy management department anyway. Who is this guy related to?

Anonymous said...

For anyone that did not know this list is from Athena Middle School ASL class.

Anonymous said...

Back when I was in high school I took quite a bit of AP classes and we did not have to pay for our textbooks, although I believe we likely were encouraged to purchase review guides - my memory is a little foggy.

What I definitely DO recall is when I showed up to college as a "sophomore" the following fall - I had received 31 college credits from all my AP exams. This allowed me to skip some introductory classes and save my family some money - which may or may not have been a good idea academically.... but financially speaking, at an out-of-state school, the financial payoff was huge. Sign up for those AP classes!

I disagree with your comment SCATS that the classes should not be offered if the district cannot support them with all the relevant texts. Why deny such a huge financial benefit over the long term to families due to some lesser short-term costs? Even if you have buy a few books.. as I said earlier... the books are a whole lot more expensive once you get to college.

I recognize your point that acceptance of AP classes is not a given and sometimes you'll get credits you don't "need" or you may not get any credit at all, but it is definitely worth the effort and limited expense.

SCATS said...

To 7:09PM ~~ Thank you for clarifying that :)

To 7:11PM ~~ AP classes serve the few, not the masses. Therefore, we as a district can either afford to offer them and do it well, or we should not offer them at all. This may sound awful (I can't believe I'm going to say it, but I will) but we don't owe anyone college credit, discounts to obtain college credits, etc ... especially when we have so many (30%) we can't even graduate each year!

Anonymous said...

To 7:11
The city schools pay for the kids to take the PSAT and SAT.
Any book necessary for a class should be provided by the district whether it is for AP or regular. We have more than enough money in the textbook budget. It is just a matter of organizing purchases and teachers planning for the needs of their students. Textbooks and library books in class groups should be the priority of a school district.
And no child can be at a disadvantage because they cannot afford the uniform or the supplies for school sponsored events. We could draw the line at wholly volunteer transatlantic trips and skiing and other pretend-kennedy activities.

Anonymous said...

Salaries and benefits come first before textbooks.

SCATS said...

To 7:40AM ~~ In Greece, just about everything comes before textbooks, lab & classroom equipment. Even Walts lifetime health care ;)